Louisiana Update #3: Anglers, hunters crucial to rescue efforts

This was also the story after the levee breaks of Katrina; the fishers came into the city and rescued scores of people and were the “eyes on the streets” during those dark days.
During this August 2016 flood, authorities have been overwhelmed and caught by surprise by the force and treachery of the rushing water and forced to wait while fishers who know how to maneuver and how to gauge currents could begin rescues. For example, it was reported on Sunday with hundreds of people trapped on I-12 since Saturday, the Louisiana State Patrol had no water equipment to get past the water on the highway and needed to either wait for other rescuers to arrive or for the water to subside.
Just another reason to honor the rural/urban connection that has been maintained through initiatives like farmers markets.#CajunNavy

 

 

Call to arms on social media attracts 60 boats.

Jared Serigne would be the first to admit most of his Facebook interaction doesn’t involve life-or-death matters. The St. Bernard resident uses the social-media forum to share hunting and fishing information with a network of “friends,” many of whom he’s never even met.

But the Hurricane Katrina survivor knew things were going to be different when he signed into the site Saturday morning.

“I woke up and saw one report of people flooded in Zachary, and I knew then it was going to be bad, so I made the decision to go,” Serigne said.

Serigne hitched up his boat, and prepared to kiss his wife and young son goodbye, but before he did, he put up a post on Facebook, letting his friends know his plans.

Within minutes, he was bombarded by messages, texts and emails from close buddies and mere Facebook friends who wanted to join his effort. Many were from St. Bernard, but others from Houma and Thibodaux joined the mission.

In all, Serigne’s call to arms attracted 60 South Louisiana residents willing to tow their boats into a dangerous situation to ease the suffering of their fellow men and women.

nola.com

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