Grocery shopping in 2014: diversified and fragmented, says FMI

Thanks to Wayne Roberts for bringing this report to our attention, which shows that shoppers are moving back to the multiple outlet shopping experience and away from supercenters; 9% of those surveyed do not even identify a primary store where they do their shopping. That may not seem like much, but that number seems to be climbing and is statistically significant for our purposes of encouraging shoppers to add farmers market to that multiple outlet list.
I think there are a few other important points in this study such as that shoppers seek out tandem claims. In other words, if they search for low calories, they look also for low sugar. Those that look for high fiber foods also seek out whole grains.
And here’s an exciting number: 90% of those surveyed said they buy local at least occasionally and that they believe that those goods are better quality and 61% think they offer better taste.
40% of the substantial grocery shopping is now done by men.
The details of how millennials shop is also useful:
•25% of twenty somethings’ meals included items purchased that same day.
•they create their shopping lists right before leaving, which will help those markets that use Facebook, Twitter and email campaigns.

2116 people were surveyed between the ages of 18-74 and supplemented by data from the US Census and the USDA and from 2013/2014 Hartman Group ethnographic research into eating and shopping.
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By Maggie Hennessy, 17-Jun-2014
Not only are today’s consumers less likely to rely on a primary store for food shopping, but they’re sharing shopping duties and planning for specific meals rather than stocking up on food, according to the Food Marketing Institute (FMI)’s annual analysis of U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends, done in collaboration with the Hartman Group.
Link to story

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