A Social Practice Cooking Experience in the Homes of NYC Immigrants

What a great idea:

Artist Lisa Gross, who founded the League of Kitchens, acknowledges that each of its workshops starts off a bit awkwardly, as six participants enter an unfamiliar neighborhood and step into a stranger’s home. Yet after five and a half hours of cooking and eating together, all led by an immigrant instructor based on her home country’s traditions, there’s a dynamic cross-cultural experience.

How it works

Kansas Teaches Refugees The Business Of Farming To Help Them Rebuild Lives

On another note, Ellingsworth said the program had assisted many participants in finding land while others have bought their homes with the aid of their farming businesses. She added that one of the participants had recently sold nearly $900 worth of produce to a single restaurant which was a lot of money for the family especially during the winter months.

Apart from gaining valuable farming and business insight with the program, the participants also find companionship and form strong bonds with other members despite their differences in languages and ethnicity. Ellingsworth says that sometimes a farmer from Myanmar may become best friends with a farmer from Somalia, and they find a way to communicate with each other

 

Source: Kansas Teaches Refugees The Business Of Farming To Help Them Rebuild Lives – 60abc

Harvest of Change

An engaging interactive story on today’s agribusiness sector from the Des Moines Register and USA Today.

Amid all the challenges, farmers find lucrative markets shaped by shifting consumer tastes. Farmers markets, where consumers can interact directly with the growers of their food, expanded steadily in the USA from 1994 to 2014, almost quintupling to 8,268, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

In 2012, fresh fruits and vegetables sold directly to consumers were a $1.3 billion industry, up 8% since 2007, the census found. That same year, organic food sales reached about $27 billion, according to the USDA, up from $11 billion in 2004.

link to the 5-part story in The Register

Harvest of Change.

Economic Opportunity Is Lowest In the Republican Bible Belt, Major Study Finds | Alternet

I suspected as much, based on the struggle that our community food systems here still have in front of them to reach any decent economic plateau. And, of course, this is another easy way to track where large swaths of institutional racism are still at work.

Economic Opportunity Is Lowest In the Republican Bible Belt, Major Study Finds | Alternet.