Nonprofit Fundraising: Venture Philanthropy

Venture philanthropy institutions are less averse to risks than typical foundations. This can give nonprofits more freedom to be open about their challenges and test whether or not their model is working. Having a venture philanthropist as a funder typically requires a heavy time investment including frequent calls, intensive support, and questioning. Be sure this is what they’re looking for. You should have criteria to determine which grants are right for you. How much time do you want to invest? Do you want a one time grant or a partnership? Venture philanthropy is not simply transactional funding.

Sometimes referred to as social entrepreneurialism, philanthropists may choose to provide start-up capital and loans to organizations that provide a social service and kick back revenue to pay for the investment. They usually have a mission focus. They then often use the investment payback to fund more projects in the community and are often non-profits themselves.

Tipping Point is one example of this type of investment. Since 2005, Tipping Point has raised more than $150 million to educate, employ, house and support those in need in the Bay Area. Last year alone, we helped put 23,000 people on a path out of poverty.

Source: Lessons from Funders

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10 Random, but Interesting Stats About Online Donors Worldwide

1. The top three causes supported by liberal-leaning online donors are human and civil rights, animals, and children and youth.

2. The top three causes supported by conservative-leaning online donors are religious services and faith, children and youth, and human services.

3. Online donors are predominately inspired to give by social media and email.

4. Of those inspired to give by social media, Facebook triggers 4X as many online donations as Twitter and 7X as many online donations as Instagram.

5. 60% of online donors donate more money during religious holidays.

6. 47% of online donors donate to nonprofits, charities, and NGOs based outside of their country of origin.

7. 62% of online donors have also volunteered at a nonprofit, charity, or NGO within the last 12 months.

8. Online donors are primarily motivated to give by empathy and altruism. Fear and anxiety have the least impact on online donors.

9. The .org, .edu, and .ngo domains are the most trusted by online donors. The .net and .com domains are the least trusted domains.

10. 73% are of online donors worldwide are female.

The inaugural edition of the Global Trends in Giving Report will be released on September 4, 2017. The report is the only annual research project dedicated to studying how and why donors worldwide give to their favorite causes and charitable organizations.

https://www.nten.org/

Facebook fundraising for 501 (c)(3) organizations

This post clearly outlines how to use the Facebook fundraising page that is available; it does require that you are a 501 (c) (3) and uses GuideStar’s listing as confirmation. It also offers the chance for your donors to opt in to your email list and allow your supporters to fundraise on the market’s behalf.  For some markets, this feature may be the answer to their fundraising needs for now.

As is mentioned in the post, the key to this is to make sure that your GuideStar page is up to date.

Facebook’s New Fundraising Tools

Local currency helps communities decide “Who tells your story”

This story is from one of my mentor think tanks,  the Schumacher Center for a New Economics on their community’s robust currency system:

On Wednesday, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced a plan to redesign the $5, $10, and $20 to be more inclusive. Too bad we have to wait until 2020 to start spending money that reflects the diversity of our country… or do we? Residents of the Berkshire region of Western Massachusetts can already walk around with a diverse history of their region in their pockets – the local currency BerkShares celebrate some of the most important figures associated with the area.

One fan of BerkShares was inspired by the opening song from Hamilton to write his own introduction, in verse, for the woman that we celebrate on the 10! Thanks to Scott Grimm-Lyon for sharing his version of the story of Robyn Van En:

The ten BerkShare female farmer with just a prayer,
saw land controlled by the millionaire,
considered the general welfare,
knew food should not be grown elsewhere,
went into the town square,
preached against local laissez-faire,
and started the world’s first farm share.

Source: Local currency helps communities decide “Who tells your story”